This is a collection of my personal work and inspirations. For my official portfolio please visit: www.michaelcinquino.com
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TOP FIVE REASONS I STILL SHOOT FILM: 
1. A LIMITED NUMBER OF SHOTS  For a 6x6 roll of 120 film I only get 12 tries to make a compelling image.  Yes, twelve.  This makes me sloooow doooown and really consider what’s in the frame and how I’m going to light the scene for every frame.  And, in turn, a more specific photo.
2. YOU CAN’T PREVIEW WHAT YOU’RE DOING ON THE BACK OF THE CAMERA.  Until I get the film back from the lab, I’m never 100% sure what I got. As a result, I don’t divide my attention between my subject and the back of the camera during the shoot.  I have to use a light meter to gauge exposure.  
3. SCANNING NEGATIVES IS VERY DIFFICULT.  At least for me.  The difficulty lies in color correction.  When I scan a negative the colors aren’t always true and it’s my job to move things around until I’m satisfied with the result.  This has helped to improve my eye for color VASTLY.  And, since I’m not a female, (women discern colors far better than men) I need all the help I can get :-)
4. HUMANS LOOK MORE HUMAN ON FILM.  I can’t explain it further than I feel I’m looking at a real person and not a photograph.
5. MY DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY HAS GOTTEN MUCH BETTER AS A RESULT OF SHOOTING FILM.  After shooting film for a bit, when I pick up my digital camera again, I’m a much better photographer.  I’m more patient, engaged, specific and methodic.  
Now go grab yourself an inexpensive medium format film camera and shoot some film! 
This photo was made on the Mamiya C3 Camera with Fujichrome Velvia film in Brooklyn, NY. 

TOP FIVE REASONS I STILL SHOOT FILM: 

1. A LIMITED NUMBER OF SHOTS  For a 6x6 roll of 120 film I only get 12 tries to make a compelling image.  Yes, twelve.  This makes me sloooow doooown and really consider what’s in the frame and how I’m going to light the scene for every frame.  And, in turn, a more specific photo.

2. YOU CAN’T PREVIEW WHAT YOU’RE DOING ON THE BACK OF THE CAMERA.  Until I get the film back from the lab, I’m never 100% sure what I got. As a result, I don’t divide my attention between my subject and the back of the camera during the shoot.  I have to use a light meter to gauge exposure.  

3. SCANNING NEGATIVES IS VERY DIFFICULT.  At least for me.  The difficulty lies in color correction.  When I scan a negative the colors aren’t always true and it’s my job to move things around until I’m satisfied with the result.  This has helped to improve my eye for color VASTLY.  And, since I’m not a female, (women discern colors far better than men) I need all the help I can get :-)

4. HUMANS LOOK MORE HUMAN ON FILM.  I can’t explain it further than I feel I’m looking at a real person and not a photograph.

5. MY DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY HAS GOTTEN MUCH BETTER AS A RESULT OF SHOOTING FILM.  After shooting film for a bit, when I pick up my digital camera again, I’m a much better photographer.  I’m more patient, engaged, specific and methodic.  

Now go grab yourself an inexpensive medium format film camera and shoot some film! 

This photo was made on the Mamiya C3 Camera with Fujichrome Velvia film in Brooklyn, NY. 

Kait Campbell
Mamiya C3 Camera
Ilford 3200 Film
100% Natural Light
Brooklyn, NY

Kait Campbell

Mamiya C3 Camera

Ilford 3200 Film

100% Natural Light

Brooklyn, NY

Kait Campbell
Polaroid 600SE
Fuji FP-3000B Instant Film
Brooklyn, NY

Kait Campbell

Polaroid 600SE

Fuji FP-3000B Instant Film

Brooklyn, NY

Kait Campbell
Fujifilm XT-1 Camera
23mm 1.4 Lens
100% Natural Light
Brooklyn, NY

Kait Campbell

Fujifilm XT-1 Camera

23mm 1.4 Lens

100% Natural Light

Brooklyn, NY

Fujifilm X-T1 f/2.5 1/500th 24mm
Caitlin Michele
MUA: Kara Graves
Brooklyn, NY
Photo by Michael Cinquino 

Caitlin Michele

MUA: Kara Graves

Brooklyn, NY

Photo by Michael Cinquino 

Canon EOS 5D Mark III f/10 1/200th 40mm
Happy to see my work in the latest issue of VOLO Magazine.  Thank you to my model Loni Andrews and my MUA Amanda Wilson for coming out wicked early on a Saturday to make it happen.

Happy to see my work in the latest issue of VOLO Magazine.  Thank you to my model Loni Andrews and my MUA Amanda Wilson for coming out wicked early on a Saturday to make it happen.

Can’t wait to get Johanna back in front of my camera (at the beach!)
MUA: Amanda Wilson
Brooklyn, NY

Can’t wait to get Johanna back in front of my camera (at the beach!)

MUA: Amanda Wilson

Brooklyn, NY

Fujifilm X-Pro1 f/4 1/125th 24mm
Candace Nirvana
Canon 5D Mark ii
100% Natural Light
Bushwick, Brooklyn

Candace Nirvana

Canon 5D Mark ii

100% Natural Light

Bushwick, Brooklyn

Kate Stoltz
Hair: Alyn Martin
MUA: Amanda Wilson
Kino Flo Lighting
Brooklyn, NY

Kate Stoltz

Hair: Alyn Martin

MUA: Amanda Wilson

Kino Flo Lighting

Brooklyn, NY

Fujifilm X-T1 f/1.2 1/1200th 56mm
Richelle
Profoto Lighting
MUA: Amanda Wilson
New York City

Richelle

Profoto Lighting

MUA: Amanda Wilson

New York City

Fujifilm X-Pro1 f/5.6 1/125th 37mm
Hilary Renee 
Canon 5D Mark ii
Profoto Lighting
MUA: Amanda Wilson
New York City

Hilary Renee 

Canon 5D Mark ii

Profoto Lighting

MUA: Amanda Wilson

New York City

Johanna
Williamsburg, Brooklyn
MUA: Amanda Wilson

Johanna

Williamsburg, Brooklyn

MUA: Amanda Wilson

Fujifilm X-Pro1 f/1.4 1/2000th 37mm
Tanya Dakin
Polaroid 600SE Camera
Fujifilm FP-3000B Instant Film
100% Natural Light
New York City

Tanya Dakin

Polaroid 600SE Camera

Fujifilm FP-3000B Instant Film

100% Natural Light

New York City

Johanna Stickland
Mamiya C3 Camera
Ilford XP2 Super 400 Film
100% Natural Light
Hair: Alyn Martin
MUA: Jennifer Kinford
New York City

Johanna Stickland

Mamiya C3 Camera

Ilford XP2 Super 400 Film

100% Natural Light

Hair: Alyn Martin

MUA: Jennifer Kinford

New York City

Demi
Profoto/Natural Light
Brooklyn, NY

Demi

Profoto/Natural Light

Brooklyn, NY

Fujifilm X-Pro1 f/2.8 1/125th 37mm